30 de junio de 2016

"Hombres buenos" en AU Agenda Urbana (junio 2016)

El Sol, 10 de junio

Títulos leídos en junio de 2016

- La vida soñada de Rachel Waring, Stephen Benatar
- La comadrona, Katja Kettu
- Irse a Madrid, Manuel Jabois
- Leer mejor para escribir mejor, María Antonia de Miquel
- El oficio, Philip Roth
- Los interesantes, Meg Wolitzer
- Mi romance, Gordon Lish
- La señorita Julia, Strindberg
- Guerreros urbanos, Jeosm y Pérez-Reverte

27 de junio de 2016

Fechas de la gira EL PINTOR DE BATALLAS en teatros

FECHAS:

Fechas confirmadas de la gira de EL PINTOR DE BATALLAS en Valladolid, Aranda, Córdoba, Toledo, Murcia, Logroño, Valencia, Bizkaia, Avilés, Pamplona, Albacete, Águilas, Palencia y Madrid

OCTUBRE

7- 9 de octubre: Teatro Calderón (Valladolid)
- 7.10.2016 Viernes, 20.30h (A)
- 8.10.2016 Sábado, 20.30h (B)
- 9.10.2016 Domingo, 19.30h (C)

14 de octubre: Aranda
Entradas

22 de octubre, 20.30h: Gran Teatro de Córdoba

24 y 25 de octubre, 20h: Segovia: La Cárcel, centro de creación.

Venta anticipada en www.turismodesegovia.com y en el Centro de Recepción de Visitantes de la Oficina de Turismo. En las taquillas de La Cárcel_Segovia Centro de Creación, una hora antes de la representación.


NOVIEMBRE


5 de noviembre: Teatro Circo (Albacete)

12 de noviembre: Serantes Kultur Aretoa (Santurtzi, Bizkaia)

19 de noviembre: Teatro de Rojas (Toledo)

26 de noviembre, 21h: Teatro Romea (Murcia)


DICIEMBRE


3 de diciembre, 20.30h: Teatro Bretón (Logroño)

9 de diciembre, 20.30h: Auditori Torrent (Valencia)

10 de diciembre: Auditorio y Palacio de Congresos Infanta Doña Elena (Águilas, Murcia)

15 de diciembre: Teatro Principal (Palencia)
Próximamente entradas aquí

17 de diciembre: Centro Niemeyer (Avilés)

18 de diciembre: Teatro Gayarre (Pamplona)



Teatros del Canal (Madrid). Del 22 de marzo al 16 de abril:
- 22/03/2017 - 16/04/2017

"What we become"- The bookbinder's daughter

Review: What We Become by Arturo Pérez-Reverte
I received an advanced review copy of this title from Atria books via NetGalley. The book was published in the original Spanish in 2010 and this English version has been translated by Nick Caistor and Lorena Garcia.

My Review:
What We BecomeMax Costa is a scoundrel and a thief but you wouldn’t know it from his refined manner and elegant clothes. We first meet him in 1928 on board the Cap Polonio, a transatlantic luxury liner bound for Buenos Aires. Max is a professional ballroom dancer on the ship and he entertains the unaccompanied young women with his tangos and fox trots. But his work as a ballroom dancer is just a cover for his real profession which his stealing from his rich dance partners. The narrative takes place between 1928 and 1966 and alternates between three distinct periods of time during which Max meets a woman whom he cannot forget.

On board the ship Max meets an intriguing Spanish couple; the husband is a world-famous composer, Armando de Troeye and his younger, gorgeous, and elegant wife Mecha Inzunza de Troeye. What draws Max to the couple at first is a very expensive pair of pearls that the wife wears which Max believes he can easily steal and make a large profit for little effort. Mecha is an excellent dancer and she is particularly skillful at the Tango, for which dance her husband has in mind to compose a new piece. Armando likes to watch while Mecha dances often with Max and this builds up the sexual tension between the dance partners.

Once they land in Buenos Aires Max, who lived in that city until he was fourteen, serves as their tour guides to all of the local dance pubs. Armando wants to know the origins of the Tango, which is not the same Tango that is performed among the European gentry. Their time in Buenos Aires is fraught with danger and tension as they go to some of the seediest places in the city. Max and Mecha also begin a passionate love affair, but their relationship, if one can call it that, is not at all what I expected. This is not a clandestine affair that is hidden from Mecha’s husband but, on the contrary, he encourages her to seduce Max and he even watches them while they make love.

Max gets his hands on Mecha’s pearls and disappears. When he next meets up with Mecha it is almost ten years later in Nice, where he has lived comfortably as a gentleman off of his ill-gotten earnings. This is one of the most exciting parts of the book because Max is asked by spies for both the Italian and Spanish governments to steal some sensitive documents from the home of a rich, society woman. Max fits in perfectly with the European gentry so he has the perfect cover to case the house and come up with a plan that involves breaking into a house and safe cracking.

During his stint as a secret agent he, once again, runs into Mecha who is living in Nice alone because her husband has been arrested among the chaos of the Spanish Civil War. The theft of the pearl necklace is all but forgotten as Mecha and Max rekindle their sexual relationship. They are drawn to each other and their physical relationship is intense, passionate and sometimes even boarders on the violent.

After Max completes his mission he must flee Nice for fear of being arrested and his farewell to Mecha this time is emotionally difficult for both of them. It is evident that the have deep feelings for each other and saying goodbye is difficult not something that they want to do. When Max meets Mecha, almost thirty years later in Sorrento, he can’t stay away from her this time either. Max is now sixty-four years old and has retired from his dangerous career as a thief. He lives a quiet life as a chauffeur for a Swiss doctor. Mecha is in town because her son, Jorge Keller, is competing in a national chess competition and Max decides to check into her hotel so he can reminisce about his younger, more exciting days.

The last part of the book also has a bit of a mystery which involves Jorge’s Russian chess opponent. There is cheating and spying going on and Mecha asks Max to help her son plot against the Russians. Max is very reluctant to get involved in international affairs, even if it is just chess, because he doesn’t want to jeopardize his now stable and quiet life. But Mecha has a secret weapon that convinces Max to come out of retirement and use his thieving skills against the Russians.

This book is full of mystery and suspense with multiple plot lines woven throughout. My problem with the book is that some scenes were so suspenseful and interesting and then others were boring and superfluous to the plot. A few scenes could have been edited to make the plot even stronger. Also, the relationship of Max and Mecha isn’t fully developed until about two-thirds of the way into the story. At first their relationship is purely physical and I would have been more interested to see the emotional side of these two characters laid out much earlier on in the plot.

Overall this was an interesting read full of mystery, passion, tango and chess. If you enjoy a good historical fiction set in the 20th century then I recommend giving this book a chance.

About the Author:
A ReverteSpanish novelist and ex-journalist. He worked as a war reporter for twenty-one years (1973 – 1994). He started his journalistic career writing for the now-defunct newspaper Pueblo. Then, he jumped to news reporter for TVE, Spanish national channel. As a war journalist he traveled to several countries, covering many conflicts. He put this experience into his book ‘Territorio Comanche’, focusing on the years of Bosnian massacres. That was in 1994, but his debut as a fiction writer started in 1983, with ‘El húsar’, a historical novella inspired in the Napoleonic era.

Although his debut was not quite successful, in 1988, with ‘The fencer master’, he put his name as a serious writer of historic novels. That was confirmed in 1996, when was published the first book of his Captain Alatriste saga, which has been his trademark. After this book, he could leave definitely journalism for focusing on his career as a fiction writer. This saga, that happens in the years of the Spanish golden age, has seen, for now, seven volumes, where Pérez-Reverte shows, from his particular point of view, historical events from Spanish history in the 16th century.

Apart from these, he also penned another successful works like Dumas Club and Flandes Panel, titles that, among others, made Pérez-Reverte one of the most famous and bestseller authors of Spanish fiction of our era.


https://thebookbindersdaughter.com/2016/06/17/review-what-we-become-by-arturo-perez-reverte/

"What we become"- FabbookReviews

Reseña comparativa


Midge Raymond’s My Last Continent & Arturo Pérez-Reverte’s What We Become

Welcome to a special spotlight feature comparing and contrasting two newly released adult fiction titles: Midge Raymond’s debut novel My Last Continent and Arturo Pérez-Reverte’s What We Become.


My Last Continent by Midge Raymond
Source: ARC courtesy of Simon & Schuster Canada. Thank you!
Publication: June 21, 2016 by Scribner

An unforgettable debut with an irresistible love story, My Last Continent is a big-hearted, propulsive novel set against the dramatic Antarctic landscape.

It is only at the end of the world—among the glacial mountains, cleaving icebergs, and frigid waters of Antarctica—where Deb Gardner and Keller Sullivan feel at home. For the few blissful weeks they spend each year studying the habits of emperor and Adélie penguins, Deb and Keller can escape the frustrations and sorrows of their separate lives and find solace in their work and in each other. But Antarctica, like their fleeting romance, is tenuous, imperiled by the world to the north.

A new travel and research season has just begun, and Deb and Keller are ready to play tour guide to the passengers on the small expedition ship that ferries them to their research destination. But this year, Keller fails to appear on board. Then, shortly into the journey, Deb’s ship receives an emergency signal from the Australis, a cruise liner that has hit desperate trouble in the ice-choked waters of the Southern Ocean. Soon Deb’s role will change from researcher to rescuer; among the crew of that sinking ship, Deb learns, is Keller.

As Deb and Keller’s troubled histories collide with this catastrophic present, Midge Raymond’s phenomenal novel takes us on a voyage deep into the wonders of the Antarctic and the mysteries of the human heart. My Last Continent is packed with emotional intelligence and high stakes—a harrowing, searching novel of love and loss in one of the most remote places on earth, a land of harsh beauty where even the smallest missteps have tragic consequences.


What We Become by Arturo Pérez-Reverte
Source: ARC courtesy of Simon & Schuster Canada. Thank you!
Publication: June 7, 2016 by Atria Books

Bestselling author and Dagger Award winner Arturo Pérez-Reverte delivers an epic historical tale following the dangerous and passionate love affair between a beautiful high society woman and an elegant thief. A story of romance, adventure, and espionage, this novel solidifies Pérez-Reverte as an international literary giant.

En route from Lisbon to Buenos Aires in 1928, Max and Mecha meet aboard a luxurious transatlantic cruise ship. There Max teaches the stunning stranger and her erudite husband to dance the tango. A steamy affair ignites at sea and continues as the seedy decadence of Buenos Aires envelops the secret lovers.

Nice, 1937. Still drawn to one another a decade later, Max and Mecha rekindle their dalliance. In the wake of a perilous mission gone awry, Mecha looks after her charming paramour until a deadly encounter with a Spanish spy forces him to flee.

Sorrento, 1966. Max once again runs into trouble—and Mecha. She offers him temporary shelter from the KGB agents on his trail, but their undeniable attraction offers only a small glimmer of hope that their paths will ever cross again.

Arturo Pérez-Reverte is at his finest here, offering readers a bittersweet, richly rendered portrait of a powerful, forbidden love story that burns brightly over forty years, from the fervor of youth to the dawn of old age.



When looking at two similarly themed book covers, readers might not only wonder if the comparable images accurately reflect the stories to be found inside, but also if the stories themselves will be similar. With My Last Continent and What We Become, the two novels, superficially, look very much alike. From a glance at cover and blurb, it looks and sounds as though we have two novels about epic love, set against the backdrop of a grand ship and wild seas. But what lies here beyond the face of covers and story promises? Authors Midge Raymond and Arturo Pérez-Reverte have constructed detailed, consuming, tense and moving stories in My Last Continent and What We Become, respectively, bridging shared themes across locales and decades, while writing absolutely singular tales.

With both My Last Continent and What We Become, we have a relationship at the core of the story: in the former, we have Deb and Keller; the latter, we have Max and Mecha. In the novels, we have two couples who meet (by fate? by luck? by chance? by will?) time after time after time. With Deb and Keller, it is their draw- their intangible and savage pull- to the gorgeous and sometimes-deadly Antarctic, and their work with Adelie penguins that brings them together again and again. It is the place where they first meet and grow to depend on each others company. Circumstance are often beyond Deb’s and Keller’s control, however, and plans for meeting and making a life beyond their strangely safe haven of the Antarctic expedition ship and base are often foiled. With Max and Mecha, we have a slightly harder-to-define love: theirs is a sometimes destructive, often deceitful, and usually carnal love that spans over four decades, with decades between two crucial and unplanned run-ins. Meeting on a cruise ship, Max masquerading as a cruise ship dancer, Mecha there as wife of an older, eccentric wealthy composer, their relationship/courtship is arguably unhealthy…for Max, former soldier and beautiful, immaculately trained young man living as a thief, the stunning, peculiar and impeccable attired and jeweled Mecha is not only someone he wants but someone he wants to steal from.

At the ends of both My Last Continent and We We Become, one thing readers may wonder is whether or not greater time spent apart than together can actually allow for a real, intense, epic love to flourish. Can short but intense meetings of very independent-minded (often selfish) people over the course of time pave the way for a great love- or is it the memory of time and absence that makes things so? In any event, Raymond and Perez-Reverte do divert in how they ultimately present their couples in the last chapters of their novels, but one will likely come away considering how love and attachment can indeed show in so many forms. Without wanting to give away any spoilers here, I will say that choice and loss factor into endings of both My Last Continent and What We Become, but the authors do so in highly disparate and fascinating ways.

As a heady trip back into the opulence and glamour of the twentieth century, What We Become takes is honeyed time, but ends up hitting many great notes (and some surprising climaxes). While tending to be heavy on the rich detail of everything from cuts of fashion, to smells, to dance and locale, readers on the lookout for a glamorous, languid, and old-fashioned kind of read may just adore how Pérez-Reverte carefully and deliberately weaves Max and Mecha’s story in What We Become. Readers looking for an excellently written suspenseful contemporary title that touches upon everything from ecological concerns to thoughts about love and solitude, may do well to try out Midge Raymond’s stunning and impressive My Last Continent.


I received copies of My Last Continent and What We Become courtesy of Simon & Schuster Canada in exchange for an honest review and for the purposes of this post. All opinions and comments are my own.

https://fabbookreviews.com/2016/06/25/spotlight-midge-raymonds-my-last-continent-arturo-perez-revertes-what-we-become/

"What we become"- Dallas News

Fiction: ‘What We Become,’ by Arturo Pérez-Reverte

By BEATRIZ TERRAZAS

Published: 17 June 2016 06:39 PM

Historical fiction and romance aren’t my favorite genres. But when a critically acclaimed Spanish author and winner of the International Dagger Award pens an epic love story between a “beautiful high-society woman and elegant thief,” I’m intrigued enough to open the book.

The story begins in 1928 on a trans-Atlantic cruise between Lisbon, Portugal, and Buenos Aires, Argentina; aboard are famous composer Armando de Troeye, who is traveling to Buenos Aires to compose a tango, and his wife, Mercedes “Mecha” Inzunza. (“Mecha” also being a word for “wick” or “match” in Spanish; I saw sparks every time Mecha was mentioned.) Also on board is Max Costa, a ballroom dancer whose job is “to entertain the unaccompanied ladies in first class or those whose companions did not dance.”

Though not born into high society himself, Max moves easily within it because of his good looks, his impeccable manners, his skill on the dance floor and his way with the opposite sex: “He always kept flawless rhythm on a dance floor, and off it his hands were steady and agile, his lips posed with the appropriate remark, the perfect, witty one-liner. … In addition to the ballroom dances (tangos, foxtrots, Bostons) that helped him earn a living, he had mastered the art of verbal pyrotechnics and sketching melancholy landscapes with his silences.”

The tango is one of Max’s specialties, and although Armando is about to write one, he seems to not be much of a dancer. One evening, Max approaches the couple after dinner and invites Mecha onto the dance floor. Armando “carefully straightened the crease in his trousers, and peered at his wife through a cloud of cigarette smoke. ‘I’m tired,” he said in a lighthearted manner. ‘I think I ate too much at dinner. I’d like to watch you dance. … Enjoy yourself. … This young man is a magnificent dancer.’”

Throughout the rest of the cruise, Armando pumps Max for information about the history of the tango — not the watered-down version in vogue now, but that which Max says was born of “Andalusian tango, Cuban habanera, Argentine milonga and black slave dances. … Those early tangos were openly lewd, with couples bringing their bodies together, entwining their legs and thrusting with their hips …”

When Armando asks if it’s still danced that way in some places, Max says, “On the fringes, though it’s increasingly rare. Depending on where it’s played, almost no one dances to it. It’s more difficult. Cruder.”

Instead of being repulsed, the high-society couple immediately begs Max to take them to the slums of Buenos Aires to see old-school tango. Despite his misgivings, Max agrees to escort them into a dangerous area for an evening that they (and readers) won’t soon forget. He has his own agenda, of course. Yes, he relishes the softness of Mecha’s skin when he dances with her, but he’s also entranced by her pearls, whose “exceptional quality glowed faintly in the light of the electric chandeliers.”

He enjoys her scent, “a perfume he couldn’t quite identify … possibly Arpège,” but he also knows there’s information and opportunity to be found in “tiepins, fobs, cigarette cases and rings … the quality and cut of a jacket, the pleat of a trouser leg or the shine on a pair of shoes.” A con and thief he may be, but he’s not alone. Users come from all walks of life, and by the end of the book, readers will wonder just who has conned whom.

Arturo Pérez-Reverte was a journalist and war correspondent for two decades before turning to fiction. He wrote The Club Dumas, The Queen of the South and The Siege, the novel that won the International Dagger Award. His attention to history and detail is immaculate, his observation of people and the human psyche keen. His characters have depth and nuance. You’ll get to know them well, but it’s going to take awhile. The story spans several decades and is told over 464 pages, the story of Max and Mecha in the 1960s woven against the backdrop of their past.

Sure, there are a few missteps; the story opens from Armando’s point of view, and then immediately shifts to Max’s for the rest of the book, making the beginning feel disjointed. There’s the occasional cliché — “legs that seemed to go on forever beneath her dark taffeta dress” — and the occasional annoyance of a repeated adjective — “astonishing” comes to mind.

But the tango — both the genteel, modern one and the older, lewder one — is such a great device around which to build a story, and such an apt metaphor for the intrigue and romance at the heart of this book that readers will forgive any missteps and instead delight in the journey.

Beatriz Terrazas is a Dallas-area writer and photographer.

What We Become

http://www.dallasnews.com/lifestyles/books/20160617-fiction-what-we-become-by-arturo-perez-reverte.ece

Fechas de la gira EL PINTOR DE BATALLAS en teatros

FECHAS:

7- 9 de octubre: Teatro Calderón (Valladolid)
26 de noviembre: Teatro Romea (Murcia)
3 de diciembre, 20.30h: Teatro Bretón (Logroño)

21 de junio de 2016

Dosier de prensa de la obra EL PINTOR DE BATALLAS














Carteles e información técnica de la obra de teatro que adapta la novela EL PINTOR DE BATALLAS





Intérpretes: JORDI REBELLÓN Y ALBERTO JIMÉNEZ
Dramaturgia y dirección: ANTONIO ÁLAMO
Espacio escénico: CURT ALLEN WILMER
El pintor del mural: ÁNGEL HARO
Iluminación: MIGUEL ÁNGEL CAMACHO
Vestuario: MIGUEL ÁNGEL MILÁN
Dirección de producción: GINA AGUIAR
Distribución: EMILIA YAGÜE

LA ÚLTIMA FOTO
Arturo Pérez Reverte, que fue reportero de guerra durante 21 años cubriendo, entre otras, la guerra de Bosnia y, en concreto, el asedio de Vukovar por los serbios, publica “El pintor de batallas” en el año 2006, una de sus novelas más intensas que, al igual que en “Territorio comanche”, se nutre de la vivencia en primera persona de los conflictos bélicos que cubrió en su labor como periodista. La concentración espacial y de caracteres de esta narración la convierten en carne de cañón del teatro. No es solo una obra sobre las guerras sino que un abanico de temas interconectados --la pintura y la fotografía, la experiencia y su recuerdo, el silenciado dolor de las víctimas y sus impasibles testigos, víctimas y verdugos, el amor y su pérdida o las complejas y matemáticas combinaciones del tiempo y el azar— se despliega en ese duelo a vida y muerte entre el fotógrafo Faulques y su retratado Ivo Markovic y, sobre todo, pone ante nuestros ojos una serie de dilemas morales casi irresolubles.
Antonio Álamo

El pintor de batallas llega al teatro

El pintor de batallas sube a los escenarios

Todo -la vida y la muerte- transcurre entre la Isla de los Ahorcados y Cabo Malo, cerca de Punta Umbría. Y, más concretamente, en el interior de una torre vigía, cuyas paredes están cubiertas por una enorme pintura circular, al pie de un acantilado donde rompen las olas. Una torre vigía que será testigo del encuentro definitivo entre dos desconocidos que, sin embargo, se convertirán en cruciales el uno para el otro.

Arturo Pérez-Reverte adapta una de sus novelas más personales y queridas al teatro. La obra, dirigida por Antonio Álamo, se estrenará, con escenografía de Curt Allen Wilmer y la colaboración del pintor Ángel Haro, el 7 de octubre en el Teatro Calderón de Valladolid

Todo -la vida y la muerte- transcurre entre la Isla de los Ahorcados y Cabo Malo, cerca de Punta Umbría. Y, más concretamente, en el interior de una torre vigía, cuyas paredes están cubiertas por una enorme pintura circular, al pie de un acantilado donde rompen las olas. Una torre vigía que será testigo del encuentro definitivo entre dos desconocidos que, sin embargo, se convertirán en cruciales el uno para el otro. Andrés Faulques -a quien dará vida Jordi Rebellón- e Ivo Markovic -le pondrá rostro Alberto Jiménez- son los protagonistas de El pintor de batallas, el texto dramático escrito por Arturo Pérez-Reverte, basado en su novela homónima publicada en 2006, que el próximo 7 de octubre se estrenará en el Teatro Calderón de Valladolid bajo la dirección de Antonio Álamo, también responsable de la dramaturgia.


Imagínese el lector que se encuentra sentado en un patio de butacas. Y que empieza la función. Se escuchan las olas del mar rompiendo en el acantilado, y también las gaviotas, que chillan volando en torno a la torre. Del fondo emerge Andrés Faulques. Pérez-Reverte lo describe así: «Tiene unos cincuenta años. Espigado. Flaco. El pelo cortado al cepillo le da un aspecto casi militar. Acaba de bañarse en el mar. Se seca el pelo con una toalla y, tras prepararse un café, trabaja en el mural».


Vale. De pronto se oye, a través de un megáfono, una música veraniega que va haciéndose más presente. Mezclado con esta escuchamos la voz en off de una mujer: «Este lugar se llama cala del Arráez, y fue refugio de corsarios berberiscos. Sobre el acantilado puede verse una antigua atalaya de vigilancia, construida a principios del siglo XVIII como defensa costera, con objeto de avisar a las poblaciones cercanas de las incursiones sarracenas. En esa torre vigía, abandonada durante mucho tiempo, vive un conocido pintor que decora su interior con un gran mural. Lamentablemente, se trata de una propiedad privada donde no se admiten visitas...».

¿Quién es ese misterioso pintor? Se trata de un personaje que ha seducido al dramaturgo y director de escena Antonio Álamo, quien se enfrenta a un reto excitante: la dirección del montaje escénico de El pintor de batallas, una de las novelas clave en la trayectoria de película de Pérez-Reverte como escritor. No estamos ante una adaptación de la novela al teatro realizada por algún experto en la obra del también periodista y académico de la Lengua cartagenero, ni ante la adaptación de otro brillante escritor o de un amigo del autor de El maestro de esgrima en quien este haya depositado su confianza. No. Del texto teatral, de la transformación de la novela en diálogo escénico, de la historia que se podrá ver en los escenarios de todo el país a partir de su estreno en Valladolid, el responsable es Pérez-Reverte. Y el resultado es un texto que, leído, se bebe con la ligereza y el placer con la que se acaricia una seda; y que, representado, promete dejar impregnado el patio de butacas de emoción. Reflexión, hostilidad, humanidad, olvido, amor, supervivencia, derrota... Y una gran y sencilla, sin aspavientos, emoción. Por supuesto que con su toque de humor, a modo de la aceituna en el vermú haciéndolo, incluso, más irresistible.

Ese misterioso pintor con el que arranca la historia de El pintor de batallas es, «en realidad, un fotógrafo de guerra, Faulques, que tras treinta años de profesión ha adquirido esa torre en cuyas paredes circulares, enfoscadas de cemento y arena para combatir su progresivo agrietamiento, trabaja en su última foto, en la foto que no pudo hacer: una pintura al fresco con la que pretende desplegar las reglas implacables que sostienen la guerra como espejo de la vida». El conjunto, añade Álamo, «forma un paisaje descomunal e inquietante, sin época, donde conviven el escudo semienterrado en la arena y el yelmo medieval salpicado de sangre con la sombra de un fusil de asalto sobre un bosque de cruces de madera, la ciudad antigua amurallada con las modernas torres de cemento y cristal».

Sí, en efecto, se trata de «una batalla de batallas, edificada sobre los propios recuerdos de Faulques. Proveniente precisamente de ese pasado, Faulques recibe la visita de un desconocido cuyo rostro, sin embargo, ha visto miles de veces. Es el rostro de la derrota: Ivo Markovic, un croata al que disparó con su cámara en Vukovar durante la Guerra Croata de Independencia y con el que obtuvo un prestigioso premio de fotografía».

«El rostro de ese Ivo Markovic», precisa, «dio la vuelta al mundo; la mirada de Faulques y el fugaz y casual instante en el que se detuvo ante él, le hizo famoso, un icono, un héroe de guerra. Ha venido a matarle. Pero antes necesita que comprenda ciertas cosas. También Faulques necesita algunas respuestas y por eso no huirá ni intentará defenderse... Por el momento».

El pintor de batallas es, en su origen, una novela en la que anida buena parte de la experiencia vital y de la filosofía existencial y sobre el arte de un escritor de raza, de un pintor de palabras que construye frescos que consiguen atrapar la mirada del lector y hacer que este emprenda viajes alrededor del mundo y de la condición humana: divertidos, sorprendentes, desoladores, iniciáticos, poblados por aventureros que ponen en juego sus cuerpos y sus almas, que arriesgan y que, en su mayoría, no se conforman con ver partir las naves hacia Troya, sino que se embarcan en ellas. Ya saldrá después el sol o aparecerá para tocarles las narices la más fiera de las tormentas o de las sirenas.

Pérez-Reverte fue reportero de guerra durante 21 años; dos décadas en las que vivió en primera persona, entre otras, la guerra de Bosnia, marco en el que tuvo lugar el asedio de Vukovar por los serbios. En El pintor de batallas, recuerda Álamo, el escritor y periodista, al igual que ya quedó claro en Territorio comanche (1994), se nutre de sus experiencias en el lugar de los hechos: la miseria humana sin tapujos, lo terrible, el puro infierno y el valor de una caricia sobre la frente de un niño asustado.

«La concentración espacial y de caracteres de esta narración la convierten en carne de cañón del teatro», defiende Álamo, para quien El pintor de batallas «no es solo una obra sobre las guerras, sino también un abanico de temas interconectados -la pintura y la fotografía, la experiencia y su recuerdo, el silenciado dolor de las víctimas y sus impasibles testigos, víctimas y verdugos, el amor y su pérdida o las complejas y matemáticas combinaciones del tiempo y el azar- que se despliega en ese duelo a vida y muerte entre el fotógrafo Faulques y su retratado Ivo Markovic y, sobre todo, pone ante nuestros ojos una serie de dilemas morales casi irresolubles».

En El pintor de batallas -¿recuerdan su lectura?- planea todo el tiempo una motivación tan discutible como atractiva, un deseo, un impulso, que sigue latiendo vivo desde que lo pusieron de moda para siempre Caín y Abel. Es decir: «Un hombre viene a matar a otro hombre». Tiene razón Álamo: «Las razones no están del todo claras. Sospechamos que para ninguno de los dos. Ante nuestros ojos despliegan razones, sentimientos y, sobre todo, batallas: historias de sangre, sudor, mierda e infinita crueldad. Historias de hombres, a fin de cuentas».

Perversión

Y si bien El pintor de batallas tiene algo de narración detectivesca, «aquí no se trata tanto de descubrir quién es el asesino -pues el asesino somos todos, o sus silenciosos cómplices- como de indagar en sus razones, en sus almas».

Defiende Álamo que esta historia de Pérez-Reverte «es una prolongada y nada complaciente anagnórisis de la perversión. De lo que nos pervierte. Cada línea ensancha aún más y profundiza el abismo y, al final, se diría que nada sólido ni consistente descansa bajo nuestros pies». «El hombre, dirá Olvido, personaje omnipresente y ausente de la narración, tiene cinco litros y pico de sangre y qué fácil es derramarla. Siglos vertiéndola y no termina de salir nunca. Faulques trabaja en su última foto, en la foto que no pudo hacer», cuenta el director del montaje. Un montaje que nos acerca a unos personajes y una historia que, además del desafío de asomarse sin miedo al corazón de las tinieblas que todos llevamos dentro, ofrecen a lectores y espectadores un caudal poético y plástico, de belleza nada cursi, en la que adentrarse a respirar en mitad de tanta dolorosa verdad. «Al pie del acantilado donde se encuentra la torre y dos hombres rinden cuentas, rompen las olas», cita Álamo. Si se cierran los ojos un momento, se puede escuchar lo hermoso de este sonido que no busca el aplauso de nadie.

Por lo que respecta a la parte artística del montaje -la escenografía es obra de Curt Allen Wilmer, la pintura mural que coprotagoniza la función quedará en manos del artista plástico y escenógrafo murciano Ángel Haro, la iluminación llevará la firma de Miguel Ángel Camacho, y el vestuario es original de Miguel Ángel Milán-, Álamo señala que un espacio escénico semicircular recreará «un suelo realista de estética dura, con restos de hormigón, escombros, arena y con el mobiliario tipo camping descrito en la novela que, de algún modo, se asocia al desolado paisaje tras una batalla». La escenografía incluye también «una escalera de caracol» que sube «hasta un pequeño segundo nivel creado improvisadamente a base de estructura de andamio, donde se ubican los elementos mínimos con los que sobrevive Faulques: el camastro, el baúl, el frigorífico, etcétera».

Por otro lado, «para recrear las paredes de la torre vigía cuelga un elemento de unos 12 metros de semicircunferencia a modo de pantalla/mural agrietado, suspendido en el aire, dejando pasar a los actores por debajo: aparecen y desaparecen en la nada. A lo lejos solo se atisba la oscuridad». Una nada/oscuridad que se convertirá al final en el mar en el que Faulques se perderá para siempre. El agujero negro «por el que puede aparecer en cualquier momento el exsoldado croata crea una intensa tensión espacial».

Respecto al paisaje intemporal en el que trabaja Faulques, con rasgos vagamente cubistas, «en nuestra propuesta», precisa Álamo, «conviven la pintura con el audiovisual, de manera que ese fresco se mantiene vivo hasta el final de la batalla». «Se trata -prosigue- de crear una pintura inacabada pero que, a lo largo de la función, se va completando, así como las grietas que la amenazan». Para ello, informa, «contamos con Ángel Haro, cuyos extraordinarios trabajos [de 2012] sobre las pinturas de Goya nos hacen soñar en la posibilidad de reproducir la pintura en la que trabaja Faulques».

http://www.laverdad.es/ababol/literatura/201604/02/el-pintor-de-batallas-sube-a-los-escenarios.html

15 de junio de 2016

What we become- Palm Beach Illustrated

"What we become" en San Francisco

El autor Arturo Pérez-Reverte contó con el apoyo de nuestra editora e Isabel Allende para el lanzamiento de su novela What We Become en San Francisco! Próxima parada: Houston y Nueva York.


Fuente: Atria Books

9 de junio de 2016

Arriaga y Pérez-Reverte crean radionovela sobre el narco



http://www.eluniversal.com.mx/articulo/espectaculos/2016/06/9/arriaga-y-perez-reverte-crean-radionovela-sobre-el-narco

6 de junio de 2016

"What we become" (Last Pérez-Reverte's novel): Reviews and dates


#1 bestselling author and Dagger Award winner Arturo Perez-Reverte delivers an epic historical tale following the dangerous and passionate love affair between a beautiful high society woman and an elegant thief. A story of romance, adventure, and espionage, this novel solidifies Perez-Reverte as an international literary giant.
Event date:
Saturday, June 11, 2016 - 7:00pm
Event address:
265 Aragon Ave
Coral Gables, FL 33134

"What We Become" with Arturo Pérez-Reverte
When: Mon., June 13, 7 p.m.
• Book Passage
o 51 Tamal Vista Blvd, Corte MaderaMARIN
o 415.927.0960
o www.bookpassage.com

http://www.bohemian.com/northbay/what-we-become-with-arturo-perez-reverte/Event?oid=2963387





Arturo Pérez-Reverte: book signing and discussion
Presented by Murder by the Book at Murder by the Book
June 15, 2016



Murder by the Book presents Arturo Pérez-Reverte. Arturo Pérez-Reverte will sign and discuss What We Become (Atria; $28).
#1 bestselling author and Dagger Award winner Arturo Perez-Reverte delivers an epic historical tale following the dangerous and passionate love affair between a beautiful high society woman and an elegant thief. A story of romance, adventure, and espionage, this novel solidifies Perez-Reverte as an international literary giant.
En route from Lisbon to Buenos Aires in 1928, Max and Mecha meet aboard a luxurious transatlantic cruise ship. There Max teaches the stunning stranger and her erudite husband to dance the tango. A steamy affair ignites at sea and continues as the seedy decadence of Buenos Aires envelops the secret lovers.
Nice, 1937. Still drawn to one another a decade later, Max and Mecha rekindle their dalliance. In the wake of a perilous mission gone awry, Mecha looks after her charming paramour until a deadly encounter with a Spanish spy forces him to flee.
Sorrento, 1966. Max once again runs into trouble and Mecha. She offers him temporary shelter from the KGB agents on his trail, but their undeniable attraction offers only a small glimmer of hope that their paths will ever cross again.
Arturo Perez-Reverte is at his finest here, offering readers a bittersweet, richly rendered portrait of a powerful, forbidden love story that burns brightly over forty years, from the fervor of youth to the dawn of old age.
Arturo Pérez-Reverte is the #1 internationally bestselling author of many critically acclaimed novels, includingThe Club Dumas, The Queen of the South, and The Siege, which won the International Dagger Award from the Crime Writers’ Association. A retired war journalist, he lives in Madrid and is a member of the Royal Spanish Academy. His books have been translated into more than forty languages and have been adapted to the big screen.
(Author photograph by Victoria Iglesias)
Admission Info:
Free Event.
Book Signing Etiquette
When attending one of MURDER BY THE BOOKs signing events, please keep the following in mind:
1. The talks/readings are free. However, if you want to get any books signed, the new book must be purchased from Murder By The Book.
2. You may always bring earlier books to be signed, but a limit may be imposed for authors who draw very large crowds.
3. For the bigger signings, numbers will be handed out, with attendees lining up for the signing in numerical order. Arrive early for low numbers.
When sending books to be signed:
Well get THREE books that you send signed for every ONE copy of the new book purchased from us.
Please call or e-mail to order signed or inscribed copies.
Email address for ordering signed books isorder@murderbooks.com

General Day and Time Info:
6:30pm


Murder by the Book
2342 Bissonnet
Houston, TX 77005


Individual Dates & Times: *
Jun 15, 2016: 6:30 pm (Wed)

http://www.artshound.com/event/detail/441982729

Arturo Perez-Reverte discusses his book What We Become

Thursday, June 16, 2016, 7:00 pm
Free
Bestselling author and Dagger Award winner Arturo Pérez-Reverte delivers an epic historical tale following the dangerous and passionate love affair between a beautiful high society woman and an elegant thief.
This event takes place at:
New York City ( NYC )
http://www.clubfreetime.com/new-york-city-nyc/free-book-reading/2016-06-16/event/270502

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WHAT WE BECOME by Arturo Perez-Reverte (Historical Fiction)
Arturo Perez-Reverte’s latest is an epic historical tale following the dangerous and passionate love affair between a beautiful high society woman and an elegant thief.

http://www.bookreporter.com/newsletters/weekly-update
Mención:
http://www.bookreporter.com/reviews/what-we-become


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AMAZON:

WORLDWIDE ACCLAIM for What We Become:

“Sparkling with witty dialogue, this elegantly translated thriller is enthusiastically recommended to sophisticated readers and those who wish to be
.” (Library Journal, Starred Review)

“Perez-Reverte summons the romantic spirit of an old black-and-white movie: impossibly glamorous, undeniably wistful.
” (Kirkus, STARRED REVIEW)

"Pérez-Reverte, who has written of women and adventure before, along with crime and betrayal,combines them all here in a hypnotic rhapsody of a novel that drinks freely from many genres: historical epic, Hitchcockian thriller, and, above all, grand love story, both heartbreaking and deliciously sexy. Pérez-Reverte masterfully,excruciatingly, jumps back and forth between the three encounters, playing the reader’s emotions masterfully and creating as much tension through the love story as through the derring-do and the betrayals that stain both. An intoxicating entertainment, pulsing with life but, at the same time, with a kind of damp, hidden lament for all that was and is no more.” (Booklist, starred review)

[What We Become] is an extraordinary novel of love and adventure,passion and intrigue, emotion, betrayal and reunions spanning across four decades of the troubled twentieth century and represented by three fascinating times and places.” (–El Mundo)

“Beautiful language, a gripping story, authenticcharacters and fascinating sceneries – these are the ingredients for anexcellent novel.” (--Nordeutscher Rundfunk)

“A great love story...a fresh documentation of the lost history of Europe
.” (– El País)

What We Become is breathtakingly written.” (–Westdeutscher Rundfunk)

Romance, life, desire and adventure, all told by Pérez-Reverte in the best way possible.” (–La Vanguardia)

“What We Become is a brilliant novel which takes us into the nostalgic world of tango,love,and crime.”
(–Neue Zürcher Zeitung)

This book is a masterpiece. It reads like a classic film. The story moves effortlessly between the dance halls of 1920s Buenos Aires, to a chess tournament in 1960s Italy, and back to Nice in the 30s. Max, a gentleman thief,meets Mecha, the beautiful wife of a famous composer, when hes working as a ballroom dancer on an ocean liner. Its his job to keep escorted women entertained. As you read, you can practically here the music as they are dancing. Their paths cross several more times in the intervening years, each time leaving its mark on them and their shared histories. As two of his capers escalate you find Max in two different nail biting moments at the same time, each making you turn pages faster and faster. WHAT WE BECOME does what Arturo Pérez-Reverte does best. He transports you to another place in time, and leaves you feeling nostalgic when the the book ends. (John Kwiatkowski Murder By The Book)

Praise for International Bestselling Author, Arturo Pérez-Reverte:

“John le Carre meets Gabriel Garcia Marquez…” (–The Wall Street Journal)

“Few contemporary writers conjure up derring-do as well as well as Arturo Pérez-Reverte.” (– The Christian Science Monitor)

“Pérez-Reverte’s literary thriller explodes withhistory, heartbreak [and] determination…
” (– Entertainment Weekly)

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What We Become
By Arturo Perez-Reverte

Release Date: June 7th, 2016
Purchase: [Chapters/Indigo] [Amazon]

Everyone knows the legends about the cursed girl--#1 bestselling author and Dagger Award winner Arturo Pérez-Reverte delivers an epic historical tale following the dangerous and passionate love affair between a beautiful high society woman and an elegant thief. A story of romance, adventure, and espionage, this novel solidifies Pérez-Reverte as an international literary giant.

En route from Lisbon to Buenos Aires in 1928, Max and Mecha meet aboard a luxurious transatlantic cruise ship. There Max teaches the stunning stranger and her erudite husband to dance the tango. A steamy affair ignites at sea and continues as the seedy decadence of Buenos Aires envelops the secret lovers.

Nice, 1937. Still drawn to one another a decade later, Max and Mecha rekindle their dalliance. In the wake of a perilous mission gone awry, Mecha looks after her charming paramour until a deadly encounter with a Spanish spy forces him to flee.

Sorrento, 1966. Max once again runs into trouble—and Mecha. She offers him temporary shelter from the KGB agents on his trail, but their undeniable attraction offers only a small glimmer of hope that their paths will ever cross again.

Arturo Pérez-Reverte is at his finest here, offering readers a bittersweet, richly rendered portrait of a powerful, forbidden love story that burns brightly over forty years, from the fervor of youth to the dawn of old age.

What We Become was the first title I picked up as part of my binge read. Taking place en route from Lisbon to Buenos Aires in 1928, it features a passionate love affair between Max and Mecha on a luxurious cruise ship. This passionate affair, although at first assumed to have ended on that cruise ship, follows the duo throughout the years in a variety of circumstances. Perilous missions, disastrous encounters, all filled with suspense, are a few of the events that pull this duo together, and it irrevocably had my attention from beginning to end. It was enchanting, wonderfully written, and ignited my imagination. I adored it! Max and Mecha were phenomenal characters that captured me, heart and soul, and had me gripping the pages and begging for more. It was perfection!

http://acupcakeandlatte.blogspot.com.es/2016/06/high-stakes-high-seas-2-books-to-help.html

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KIRKUS REVIEW

Prolific master Pérez-Reverte (The Siege, 2014, etc.) returns with a novel of fate, love, and deception that spans four decades as two beautiful misfits struggle to make a real human connection despite the violent politics of the Spanish Civil War and then the Cold War.
Max Costa grows up in the slums of Buenos Aires to become the consummate con man: suave, handsome, and quick-fingered. While working as a ballroom dancer on a luxury ocean liner in 1928, he encounters Mecha, sparking a short but passionate affair. But Mecha is married to a famous Spanish composer with eclectic sexual tastes, and when the composer insists that Max escort the couple into the Argentinian underworld so that he might find gritty inspiration to write a “perfect tango,” the night that follows puts Max on the run. Ten years later, now a successful thief, Max is recruited as a spy by two Italian agents, and while infiltrating a high-society party, he once again runs into Mecha. Passion reignites, but once again Max must leave precipitously. Both these stories unfold in pieces, intercut with a third encounter between Max and Mecha in 1966 as Mecha’s son competes against a Russian for a chance to play in the world chess championship. In typical Pérez-Reverte fashion, the novel’s strength is in its details and its lush descriptions of exotic places and luxurious parties that contrast with political violence. This novel is also driven by the deeply flawed humanity of its two main characters: their desire and their inability to trust anyone, even each other, despite their strong connection. The sense of regret that imbues the 1966 storyline elevates the novel to a meditation on the ravages inflicted on the body and spirit by time and history.
Pérez-Reverte summons the romantic spirit of an old black-and-white movie: impossibly glamorous, undeniably wistful.

https://www.kirkusreviews.com/book-reviews/arturo-perez-reverte/what-we-become-reverte/

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What We Become
BY ARTURO PÉREZ-REVERTE



Is it a tango? Is it a chess match? What We Become could be read either way: a passionate dance of lovers coming together and separating over a lifetime, or a match where motives are minutely analyzed before each “move.” Mr. Pérez-Reverte has given us yet another work of literary art that is enjoyable and thought-provoking.
The tango and chess are key topics in the story, which begins in 1928 when famed composer, Armando de Troeye, and his stunning wife, Mecha Inzunza, travel to Buenos Aires aboard a luxury liner. Max Costa is the professional dancer onboard. He is Argentinian, a devilishly handsome rogue and perfect match for Mecha as they capture the dance floor in superbly performed tangos. In Buenos Aires, Max introduces the couple to a skid row bar and the “Old School Tango” – a source of inspiration for Armando and tantalizing foreplay for Max and Mecha. Their affair flares, but they soon part. It will rekindle eleven years later in Nice where Mecha waits for news of Armando’s fate in revolutionary Spain and Max’s past entangles him in a double-dealing espionage caper. Battered and hunted, Max turns to Mecha for help. Again they part. The separation is longer this time – until 1966. They are in their sixties now, in Sorrento. The fire between them is tamped, their bodies no longer beautiful. The relationship takes a different turn and propels the story into a suspenseful and, finally, bittersweet ending.
As an enthusiastic fan, it was a pleasure to open a new work by Mr. Pérez-Reverte, and I was not disappointed. The originality, intelligence, and superb writing are all there. Though some of the more introspective passages were a test of patience, the wait was worthwhile for the dynamic action that followed. An excellent read!

https://historicalnovelsociety.org/reviews/what-we-become/

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What We Become by Arturo Perez-Reverte

June 1, 2016
Reviewed by Richard Goldman
Hardcover June 2016
Buy it at Mystery Lovers Bookshop

Ive certainly enjoyed every book by Arturo Perez-Reverte although some Ive loved more than others. In the latter category titles like The Flanders Panel, The Fencing Master and The Siege come to mind. Now Id like to add What We Become.
At my stage of life how could I not love a story filled with bittersweet romance, the simultaneous satisfactions and regrets of growing older, the memories of past events. Plus weve got cosmopolitan backdrops, gorgeous clothes and the best of the 20s, 30s and 60s.
The story spans 40 years and concerns a deep love between two people who only spend perhaps three weeks together during that period. Max Costa meets Mecha Inzunza in 1928 on a trans-Atlantic liner bound for Buenos Aires where Mechas husband intends to write a tango that, by being better than Ravels Bolero will win a bet that he has with that well-known composer. While Mecha and her husband Armando are wealthy first class passengers Max is employed by the ships owners to be a dancing partner for passengers. In this he is very accomplished: handsome, debonair, well-dressed, an excellent dancer. Naturally hes almost quite a gigolo and on the way to becoming quite a thief.
Over the coming 40 years Max and Mecha will meet twice more: in 1937 in Nice and in 1966 in Sorrento. On each occasion Max is up to no good but the attraction between the two lovers is undiminshed. The strands of these three stories are interwoven throughout the book with interesting parallels and contrasts as the story in the "present" carries forward while we gradually uncover the past events that led these two to their current situation.
While the romantic and erotic shenanigans carry on there is plenty of other intrigue including jewel thefts, the Spanish Civil War, Max working for fascist spies and finally, a chess matchup between Mechas son and a Russian grandmaster that is chock full of Cold War-era hostility.
Brilliantly written, full of wonderful historical scenes, two unforgettable characters. Who could ask for more.

http://www.revuzeit.com/reviews/2016/2/18/what-we-become-by-arturo-perez-reverte

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What We Become, by Arturo Pérez-Reverte


When Max Costa signed up as a ballroom dancer for the Cap Polonio in 1928, he didn’t know he would meet a woman who would haunt him for the rest of his life. To be fair to Mecha Inzunza, she didn’t know she was going to meet the love of her life on a trip to Buenos Aires, either. Arturo Pérez-Reverte’s What We Become (translated by Nick Caistor and Lorenza Garcia) follows Max and Mecha over forty years, from Buenos Aires in 1928 to Nice in 1938 to Sorrento in 1964. What We Become is the story of two different kinds of scoundrels who keep getting caught up in their own schemes, though there is always the hope that this time will be different.
What We Become jumps back in forth in time, with Max as our lodestar. He’s not a first person narrator, but the story stays tightly focused on him throughout. The bulk of the novel takes place in 1964, in Sorrento, Italy. Max has, finally, settled into a steady job at the age of 64. He’s a chauffeur for a Swiss psychologist. When the psychologist leaves for an extended business trip, Max is left at loose ends. It is pure chance that he spots Mecha with her son and future daughter-in-law in town. They are there for a chess tournament. Seized with the desire to see Mecha again and relive the old days, Max “borrows” his employer’s car and clothes, empties his own bank account, and sets up like the playboy he used to be. Then he arranges to bump into Mecha again.
While Max and Mecha get reacquainted, the narrative takes us back to their first and second meetings. We see them tangoing in Buenos Aires before Max takes off with Mecha’s pearls after a brief and disturbing sexual liaison. We also see them in Nice, France, in 1938. Max has been blackmailed by agents of both the Italian government and the Spanish Nationalist government to steal some papers that would make everyone look bad if they were made public.
Again and again, Max and Mecha gently torment each other. They are always terribly polite and well-mannered (except in bed), but the subtext of their relationship is heartbreaking. Ever since their first tango on the ship to Buenos Aires, they’ve had a connection. No one else has been right for either of them and they’ve spent many lonely years apart.
The hope that the third time is the charm keeps us going along, even though both Max and Mecha have changed a lot since 1938. Mecha is now devoted to her son, who may be the next international chess champion if he can defeat the current holder of the title. Max is weary after years of financial failures. Don’t get the wrong impression, however. What We Become is not a romance. Rather, this book is a psychological portrait of two characters who have lived very unusual but unhappy lives. Further, because we learn about Mecha through Max’s life, she remains very mysterious. I’ve just spent almost 500 pages with her and I still don’t understand the woman.
What We Become is masterly in its characterization—even with Mecha’s unexplored motivations. Not only are the characters amazingly well-drawn, Pérez-Reverte has truly captured the lost world of old Europe and Buenos Aires. (Both Mecha and Max are creatures from a different age when we see them in 1964 Sorrento.) The descriptions of clothing and manners and places are richly detailed, so much so that I thought I could smell the spilled alcohol in the Argentinian dives and the cigarette smoke at the dinner party in Nice. This book is an immersive experience.
I received a free copy of this book from NetGalley for review consideration. It will be released 7 June 2016.

https://abookishtype.wordpress.com/2016/05/10/what-we-become-by-arturo-perez-reverte/

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Friday May 13
What We Become, by Arturo Pérez-Reverte
Max is a thief and a bit of roué—oh, but what a roué, the kind men envy and women can’t resist. Born in the Buenos Aires slums in the early twentieth century, Max fought his way out of there and reinvented himself as an elegant Spaniard, employed on ocean liners as a tango dancer to entertain the ladies while their husbands drink brandy. Then he meets Mecha, sees her pearl necklace, and finds himself torn between business and pleasure: “the taste of absinthe in his mouth was sweet like a promise of women and adventure.”

http://www.booklistreader.com/2016/05/13/book-lists/reviews-of-the-week-peter-lovesey-a-j-hartley-arturo-perez-reverte-and-more/


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What We Become.


Pérez-Reverte, Arturo (author).
Translated by Nick Caistor.

June 2016. 464p. Atria, hardcover, $27(9781476751986); e-book, $14.99(9781476752006).
REVIEW. First published May 1, 2016 (Booklist).

Max is a thief and a bit of roué—oh, but what a roué, the kind men envy and women can’t resist. Born in the Buenos Aires slums in the early twentieth century, Max fought his way out of there and reinvented himself as an elegant Spaniard, employed on ocean liners as a tango dancer to entertain the ladies while their husbands drink brandy. Then he meets Mecha, sees her pearl necklace, and finds himself torn between business and pleasure: “the taste of absinthe in his mouth was sweet like a promise of women and adventure.” Max gets both, much more than he bargained for, really, but yet, not nearly enough. Pérez-Reverte, who has written of women and adventure before, along with crime and betrayal, combines them all here in a hypnotic rhapsody of a novel that drinks freely from many genres: historical epic, Hitchcockian thriller, and, above all, grand love story, both heartbreaking and deliciously sexy. Max and Mecha only meet three times—on the ocean liner, where their life-consuming passion ignites; in 1937, in Nice, where it burns again (and where Max is in full Cary Grant To Catch a Thief mode); and, much later, in 1966, when the near-elderly couple are thrown together with more dangers to confront. Pérez-Reverte masterfully, excruciatingly, jumps back and forth between the three encounters, playing the reader’s emotions masterfullyand creating as much tension through the love story as through the derring-do and the betrayals that stain both. An intoxicating entertainment, pulsing with life but, at the same time, with “a kind of damp, hidden lament for all that was and is no more.”— Bill Ott

http://www.booklistonline.com/ProductInfo.aspx?pid=7982910&AspxAutoDetectCookieSupport=1